Hats off to the workhorses of the garden!

 There are nearly 7000 species of worms on our planet, but the two that we want in our garden are the burrowing and feeding kind.  Often referred to as Nature's plow, the burrowing worm aerates the soil, creating horizontal pathways underground.  The feeding worms thrive on decaying organic matter and leave rich worm castings behind, providing a wonderful natural fertilizer.  The worms pictured above are red wigglers. They live in worm bins in the greenhouse, consume half their weight in kitchen scraps each day and double their population in 90 days!  Their favorite foods are the melon rinds and avocado skins, but they'll eat most everything we toss in. Hats off to these hard working friends of our farm!

There are nearly 7000 species of worms on our planet, but the two that we want in our garden are the burrowing and feeding kind.  Often referred to as Nature's plow, the burrowing worm aerates the soil, creating horizontal pathways underground.  The feeding worms thrive on decaying organic matter and leave rich worm castings behind, providing a wonderful natural fertilizer.  The worms pictured above are red wigglers. They live in worm bins in the greenhouse, consume half their weight in kitchen scraps each day and double their population in 90 days!  Their favorite foods are the melon rinds and avocado skins, but they'll eat most everything we toss in. Hats off to these hard working friends of our farm!