It's time to plant peas!

 The trellises are in place, so we are ready to plant our peas next week.  Peas use tendrils to climb the trellis.  These thin, wiry structures along the plant's stem actually wave around until they come in contact with something they can grab onto.  Once they've made contact (and in this case, with the netting) the tendrils curl and form coils, allowing the plant to pull on the support.  Kathy LaLiberte, in her article on  How Plants Climb,  likens it to a rock climber in need of footholds in the form of horizontal supports.  Peas enjoy the cool weather of spring and will be finished with their harvest and ready to be pulled out to make way for tomato plants at the end of May.

The trellises are in place, so we are ready to plant our peas next week.  Peas use tendrils to climb the trellis.  These thin, wiry structures along the plant's stem actually wave around until they come in contact with something they can grab onto.  Once they've made contact (and in this case, with the netting) the tendrils curl and form coils, allowing the plant to pull on the support.  Kathy LaLiberte, in her article on How Plants Climb, likens it to a rock climber in need of footholds in the form of horizontal supports.  Peas enjoy the cool weather of spring and will be finished with their harvest and ready to be pulled out to make way for tomato plants at the end of May.